Thursday, 12 March 2009

Costa holds NGO dialogue at UN High Level Segment

Antonio Maria Costa, the Executive Director of UNODC, called an NGO Dialogue Meeting on the afternoon of Thursday 12th March. He expressed his keenness to engage with civil society and highlighted that this session was an opportunity interact and exchange views. Mr Costa advised that he was seeking the views from the NGOs on how the recommendations from the ‘Beyond 2008’ process can be operationalised. ‘I believe that unless we deal with civil society, we leave drug and crime control in the hands of governments. You are the eyes and ears on the ground’ he advised.
The NGOs who attended the dialogue with Mr Costa, held on the second day of the High Level Segment, were advised that any issues they had with the content of the Political Declaration should be taken up with the member states as UNODC had no influence over this. He also advised that the decision to give NGOs slots to speak at the end of the roundtable sessions was out of his hands – this was also down to the member states participating at the CND. When asked why he had not pushed harder for harm reduction language within the Political Declaration, Mr Costa advised that he had refrained from intervening at the negotiation meetings on the text of the Political Declaration and its annex, as he knew his views on harm reduction would not have been listened to.
Mr Costa emphasized that he still views UNODC as the lead agency on harm reduction despite the lack of harm reduction language in the new Political Declaration and the scant references to health within the document. He stated that he ‘had been outspoken about harm reduction’ and that he was ‘not afraid of words’. UNODC would continue its work on harm reduction and HIV prevention and it would take a great deal to convince Mr Costa that they should do otherwise.
The lack of meaningful engagement with drug users by the CND was raised and Mr Costa agreed that this was indeed an issue. In the HIV/AIDS world, he noted that he had seen such people, ‘witnesses’, playing a positive role but he felt it would be hard to convince the governing bodies that drug users should be included. ‘It doesn’t mean we shouldn’t try but I am not optimistic. The logic would be to make governing bodies more aware of conditions on the ground,’ he advised. Mr Costa was also asked to explain whom he was referring to when he used the term ‘the pro-drug lobby’ as he himself had now embraced harm reduction. Mr Costa said that he did not use this term to mean the harm reduction community.

Undoing a decade of neglect: International drug policy and access to essential medical and harm reduction services

IHRA, Human Rights Watch, International AIDS Society and YouthRISE held a joint satellite event on the morning of Thursday 12th March. The speakers highlighted the failings of the past decade of drug control in ensuring access to health and essential medicines for vulnerable populations and expressed their deep dissatisfaction with the new Political Declaration that will shape the next ten years of drug control. Craig McClure, Executive Director of the International AIDS Society, condemned the new Political Declaration as ‘fundamentally flawed, without a clear call for evidence based approaches for reducing drug related harm’. Sujan Jirel of YouthRISE called for harm reduction services for young people and the realisation of the right of young people to participate in decision making processes that affect them. Human Rights Watch advocate, Rebecca Schleifer, argued that a major negative consequence of drug control is the lack of access to essential medicines for pain relief. Access to pain relief is part of the right to health and member states must be called upon to uphold their obligations. The final speaker, Professor Gerry Stimson, the Executive Director of the International Harm Reduction Association, referred to the limited references to health in the Political Declaration and called into question UNODC’s role as the lead UN agency on harm reduction.

YouthRISE statement at the Demand Reduction Roundtable

Caitlin Padgett of YouthRISE spoke this morning at the Demand Reduction Roundtable.

'Thank you very much for the opportunity to speak here. Including young people in these policy forums is crucial to demand reduction policy development.

The statements I am about to give come not only from our organization - they were developed in partnership with the Global Youth Coalition on HIV/AIDS, the World AIDS campaign, Espolea, Students for Sensible Drug Policy, the Youth Coalition on Sexual and Reproductive Health Rights and Youth RISE. (Collectively represented thousands of youth worldwide)

We all wish to prevent young people from the harms of drugs and drug policy. However, prevention measures are often not enough. Anti-drug campaigns are often no match for the many reasons that young people use drugs. Despite millions of dollars spent on prevention campaigns, children and young people continue to use drugs. Despite even more money spent on supply reduction, young people still have access to drugs. Young people use drugs for many reasons… They use them for fun, to fit in, for survival, to deal with hunger, with trauma, to cope and to alleviate pain. The concept of prevention is lost on the many youth already using drugs. Telling them or forcing them to stop will not work if their life circumstances remain unchanged.

Demand reduction must include harm reduction. Harm reduction is part of a continuum of support services and it is one of many tools available to reducing the demand for drugs, While the debate about harm reduction continues, children and youth were dying for lack of these life saving services. Thousands, if not millions are at risk for HIV and other drug related harms, especially in Central and Eastern Europe, Asia and North America.

Are these children and youth who use drugs still considered our most precious asset, as stated in the Declaration? If so, than we must invest in them as well. We must invest in all aspects of their growth and development, and work to make sure that the most vulnerable are treated with as much care and love than those who have never touched a drug in their lives.

We recommend that drug policy include specific recommendations for young people and take into consideration the four guiding principles of the Convention on the Rights of the Child.

Non-discrimination: Removing age-related barriers such as requiring parental consent or denying confidentiality to underage youth, removing age restrictions for accessing harm reduction services such as syringe exchanges and opiate replacements, and providing sexual and reproductive health services to young people, especially young drug users.

Best interest of the child: All drug policies must adhere to international human rights law. This will ensure that drug policies would be required to take into consideration those most vulnerable and in need of support such as young substance users and street-involved youth.

Life, survival and development: Honest, reality-based drug education and prevention services, low threshold and youth-friendly services, access to education and health services, are all essential components of effective drug policy that seeks to ensure the high attainable health for young people using drugs. Make evidence-based and age appropriate drug treatment to be a priority over detention, imprisonment or forced rehabilitation.

Participation: Countries must involve young people who are most affected (including young drugs users and YPLWHIV) in meaningful engagement with drug policy and program development, implementation and evaluation at all levels. Young drug users and young people living with HIV do not forfeit their right to participation. It is our right to be included in the decisions that affect our lives.

We look to the HIV/AIDS movement to see the critical importance of both acknolewdging the critical need for both recognizing the realities of young people and involving them in policy. Young people were not included to too many years, because adults did not want to deal with the reality of young people having sex, and they did not want to talk to young people about what they needed in terms of prevention. And in 2007, young people age 15-24 made up nearly half, 50% of new HIV infections. So we can see that not involving youth does not work.

There are young people here at these meetings. Young people who are incredible advocates, with the most accurate insights into the realities of young people, because they are living those realities. If youth really are our most precious asset, if we are truly committed to demand reduction for young people, than we should be looking to these young people for advice. Yet instead, they have been regarded with suspicion, have been followed by security, and have generally been made to feel unwelcome.

If member states are truly committed to reducing social marginalization, as stated in Article 21 of the declaration, than why don’t we start right here, right now?

Many of you seated here have responsibilities other than drug control. Consider what kind of society the youth in your country are growing up with. Consider how many have safe and affordable housing, how many have access to education opportunities and employment, and to social support services. These are some of the best demand reduction strategies.

Thank you for this opportunity.'

Statement of UNAIDS at the HLM

The official text as delivered by Elhadj As Sy, Deputy Executive Director, UNAIDS

'Chair, Distinguished representatives, ladies and gentlemen,

The Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) is pleased to have this opportunity to address the Commission on Narcotic Drugs.

This important occasion marks the decade which has passed since the UN General Assembly’s Special Session on drugs. When the General Assembly met on this issue in 1998 it was already clear that the world drug problem and the growing HIV epidemic could not be addressed in isolation from one another.

Today, it is clearer than ever that these are closely intertwined problems. And it is also clear that effective solutions are at hand.

Estimates of the number of injecting drug users, and the number of injecting drug users living with HIV, have been produced under the auspices of the Reference Group to the United Nations System on HIV and Injecting Drug Use. The most recent estimates, last year, suggested that there are around 16 million injecting drug users worldwide. Of those, around two and a half to three million are living with HIV.

HIV among injecting drug users exists in every region of the world. Outside sub-Saharan Africa, nearly a third of the total HIV epidemic can be attributed to this mode of transmission. HIV epidemics among injecting drug users can spread extremely quickly. For example, the major epidemics of HIV among injecting drug users in some of the countries of Eastern Europe and Central Asia are relatively new phenomena – before the 1990s there was very little HIV spread in these countries. This must give us concern when we look at the evidence of the spread of drug injecting into new regions. Equally, there is a strong association between amphetamine use and the risk of sexual transmission of HIV. Breaking this nexus is vital to addressing the spread of HIV in many of the most vulnerable populations.

However, above all, we must recall that the spread of HIV among injecting drug users is preventable.

A set of measures when delivered at full scale have demonstrated effectiveness in reducing the spread and impact of HIV. Providing drug users with a full range of treatment options including drug substitution treatment, peer outreach, and sterile needle and syringe programmes are effective ways of tackling HIV. These need to be provided alongside voluntary, confidential HIV counselling and testing, condom programmes and treatment of sexually transmitted infections. And the third pillar of an effective response to HIV among drug users is access to primary healthcare and antiretroviral therapy.

A practical and proactive human rights response to HIV among injecting drug users is to ensure universal access to harm reduction. Unfortunately, that is far from the reality today. As the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Navi Pillay commented this week, “all too often, drug users suffer discrimination, are forced to accept treatment, marginalized and often harmed by approaches that over-emphasize criminalization and punishment while under-emphasizing harm reduction and respect for human rights.”

The HIV epidemic has demonstrated in relation to all vulnerable populations that the most effective approaches are those which involve the most vulnerable rather than seek to criminalize and further stigmatize them.

There are many countries around the world which have made significant strides forward in providing comprehensive responses to HIV among injecting drug users, including through scaling up the full set of harm reduction measures. Further support to countries in advocacy, building technical capacity, involving civil society and mobilizing resources is a key priority of the joint United Nations Programme on AIDS, UNAIDS, including our Cosponsor UNODC which has a lead role in this area, as well as other partners including WHO.

Distinguished delegates,

At its session last year the Commission called on member states represented both in the Commission and in the UNAIDS Programme Coordinating Board to better coordinate and align these complementary efforts. The UNAIDS Board has noted the importance of decreasing HIV transmission and co-infection in people who use drugs. This builds on the unanimous commitment of member states at the UN General Assembly’s AIDS Special Session in 2001 explicitly calling for “harm reduction efforts related to drug use”.

These commitments were repeated in the General Assembly’s Political Declaration on AIDS in 2006 which set the groundwork for universal access to HIV prevention, treatment care and support.

Harm reduction should not be seen or implemented in isolation. Harm reduction is not contradictory to other valuable drug demand reduction strategies, like prevention, treatment, rehabilitation and reintegration. Harm reduction is an essential part in the chain of drug demand reduction.

Harm reduction programmes and services designed to reduce HIV transmission and impact are not in contradiction to drug control efforts. To the contrary: they are good public health and they contribute greatly to broadening access to health and social services for drug users, and through this to greater social cohesion and communal security.

I am aware of the fact that harm reduction is sometimes a controversial concept in some countries. I feel it as a responsibility of UNAIDS to assure you that harm reduction measures are not jeopardizing our efforts to reduce the drug problem.

UNAIDS, with all our Cosponsors including UNODC, remain inspired by the global commitment of all member states of the United Nations to universal access to HIV prevention, treatment, care and support.

Behind these commitments are millions of families and communities struggling with the burden of HIV.

For them and for the millions struggling with drug addiction we have a moral duty to ensure they are reached with effective and inclusive programmes.

Thank you.'

Day 3 Russia Interjects

6 BIS Proposes that the ommitee of the whole to discuss this paragraph as there ahs not been a disscussion

CND Day Three Chairman

ay away from L9 udgetary matters

Comments from Members

UK - Preamble Para 2 unsure why it exists states the importance of a meeting, why is this important
Chair - Issue of clarification of the importance of the meeting. What is being discussed is clarification rather than the meeting.
Argentina: Argue that articles 1 and 2 are subject of important

Paraguay Speech to HLM

Drug traffickers use small planes to go over Paraguayan territory. If 40 – 60kg of cocaine going over our air space, the minimum the international community could do is support us with the technology we need to identify and intercept these drugs, this is the least that can be expected of international cooperation. From each dollar we have received from other sources we have been able to do million dollars of work. Paraguay has been devoted to eradicating illicit crops but as soon as these crops are destroyed others are destroyed. The presence of our forces once they have come into these different villages and areas is simply temporary, the plants pop up again. The eradication of illicit crops should have as a prior prerequisite alternative development so before destroying our cannabis fields the international community should be able to provide these poor farmers with legal alternatives. Paraguay would like to make a friendly observation – there must be an end to the discrimination that exists between marijuana fields and coca and opium fields when it comes to international agencies deciding what cooperation they are going to make available for alternative development. The cooperation received by coca farmers is considerable and they get tariffed preferences for the manufactured replacement products but those who produce marijuana don’t get these incentives – there is discrimination and there is no incentive for these farmers to grow something else. In our national assembly there is a bill for decriminalisation of personal consumption. My delegation is going to evaluate this possibility of marijuana. Paraguay is away of the economic cloak of transnational trafficking gangs which will seek to have political power locally and legally therefore we must endow technological and upgraded human resources so as to strengthen work against corruption. In concluding given the emphasis laid we would hope these would be applied to marijuana as well. The distinguished delegation of Peru, we would add our voice but ask them not to rule out any natural plant.

Sudan

Delegation want to support Argentina cannot accpt chanbge to 1 and 2
Mexico delegation agrees with previous countries teaxt has been painfully
China supports what was said by Sudan and other delegation
Pakistan minimum agreed upon the previous speakers
Colombia ab lib
Russian Fed supoorts aht was the agreed text
Indonesia agree withe the resolution
Zimbabwe 14 more resolutions to go
Lebanon Add to all that was previoualy mentioned, refrain from exercise and put t

Paraguay Speech to HLM

Drug traffickers use small planes to go over our territory. If 40 – 60kg of cocaine going over our air space, the minimum the international community could do is support us with the technology we need to identify and intercept these drugs, this is the least that can be expected of international cooperation. From each dollar we have received from other sources we have been able to do million dollars of work. Paraguay has been devoted to eradicating illicit crops but as soon as these crops are destroyed others are in place. The presence of our forces once they have come into these different villages and areas is simply temporary, the plants pop up again. Illicit eradication should have as a prior prerequisite alternative development so before destroying our cannabis fields the international community should be able to provide these poor farmers with legal alternatives. Paraguay would like to make a friendly observation – there must be an end to the discrimination that exists between marijuana fields and coca and opium fields when it comes to international agencies deciding what cooperation they are going to make available for alternative development. The cooperation received by coca farmers is considerable and they get tariffed preferences for the manufactured replacement products but those who produce marijuana don’t get these incentives – there is discrimination and there is no incentive for these farmers to grow something else. In our national assembly there is a bill for decriminalisation of personal consumption. My delegation is going to evaluate this possibility of marijuana. Paraguay is away of the economic cloak of transnational trafficking gangs which will seek to have political power locally and legally therefore we must endow technological and upgraded human resources so as to strengthen work against corruption. In concluding given the emphasis laid on alternative development and poverty eradication, we would hope these would be applied to marijuana as well. We ask you not to rule out any natural plant.

El Salvador Speech to HLM

My delegation endorses the statement made by Argentina on behalf of G77 and China and we wish to express our gratitude for the unodc devision and development of new initiatives for crime prevention work. We express our staunch support to UNODC to continue carrying out its work in a timely way. Due to its strategic position on the continent, central America suffers from organised crime and the posititioning of cartels which have converted our countries into transits. We seek to guarantee regional security from a comprehensive standpoint.we are all aware of the adverse impact on drug trafficking on security and stability through corruption and terrorism. We repeat our firm condemnation of all these scourges. We believe in the need for mechanisms to prevent and combat all these problems to combat violence and we look for alternative means to combat drug prevention and crime. In this spirit we wish to point out our regional summit – the cartaljena declaration and plan of action. It is important to have a shared and common responsibility and we should investigate and punish crimes related to drugs. A serious threat to peace and social stability is the problem of the criminal action of gangs, this is a cross border matter and we are working out comprehensive polices for direct conduct against these gangs for rehabilitation. We are also working to encourage the signing of internatiaonl conventions and we are working towards an international law enforcement academy which facilitates technical training for all officials. We support the establishment of a regional centre in el Salvador, mr costa will be visiting my country to inaugaurate this. We want to share experiences and look at every link in the chain. We believe it is important to have networks and combat this scourge. Madame chair there have been many challenges from the 1998 ungass general assembly session and it is only the political will that means we can come to grips with this and destroy our populations.

Chair

Hesitant UK and |Netherlands who wanted object:
Netherlands: Does this mean that if anything is produced in INGOV
UK: Support netherlaNDS DONT ANTICIPATE THAT THE CND WONT DISCUSS THE ISSUE AND whaT THE IMPLICATIONS ARE RUSIA, ARGENTINA1, NEGOTIATING ETHICS TO POINT OF FATIGUE, DIFFERENT EXPECTATIONS IN ORDER TO ACHIEVE A VALID POINT OF ETHICS. cHINA: OTHER DELEGATIONS ASTONISHED THAT THEY HAVE EXPRESSED THERE VIEWS IN SUCH A WAY THE CHINES DELEGATIUON HAS MANY VIEWS REGARDING THE TEXTX. WOULD LIKE TO ADOPT SINCRE DEBATE. IN JULY WHEN ECOSOC IS IN SESSION WE SHOLD OBEY THE ETHICS OF DIPLOMACY
SWEDEN: PROPOSALS BY NETH OF AMENDING PPI BECAUSE IT DHOILU. pp2 IMPORTANCE OF THE WORKING GROUP IN ASSISTING THE RESOLUTION. nO NEED FOR ANY AMENDMENT. GERMANY: DRAFT RESOLUTION DISCUSSED AT SOME LENGTH ALREADY SUGGESTION LOOK AT PROPOSED AMENDMENTS AND WHETHER THE NEED TO RELOOK EXISTS. REFERRING TO 1ST PREAMBULAR PARAGFRAPH SHOULD BE CONVENED FOR OTHER PUROPOSES. SUGESTIONS TO BRIDGE THE DIFFERENCE
COLOMBIA: MY DELEGATION IS TROUBLED BY THE FACT BEEN GOING ON GOR TOO LONG.
CHAIR/; TWO OPTIONS, INSERT MINIMAL INERTION, DISCUSSIONS TOO LENGHTHY. T SALK ON SUBSTANCE ISSUES THAT HAVE BEEN GOING ON FOR TOO LONG. MAKE MINIMAL INSERTION. CHINA OBJECTS, OBJECTION OF PRINCIPLE, ASKS GERMAN REP TO REPEAT SECOn role of fingolND "INSERTION2 TO BE HONEST TWO PROPSALS ARE NOT SUBSTANTIVE AND HAVE NOTHING OF SUBSTANCE" SWEDEN REC THE RIGHT TO MAKE PROPOSALS. ARGENTINA "All texts negotiated repeatedly, could they change the text o If these are the only two amendments to annex 1 and annex 2 Charman Question to the room in first and second para fielded to the room. UK Draft decision adopted as consensus as a short overview spread consensus to the commision

Sweden
\para 12 to havs sams langu, pARA 5 after formal consultation#

Netherlands comment on germany on second para - amendments be raed aloud to the floor, is it being put fwd by member states or the commission.

Amendment

1st pre para annex one will hold reconvened sessios on th

aware of the imp of the role of the standing grouo

Having traveled to facilitae the work porpose the two texts the resolution and the amendment para 8 working group decid to furthjer facilitate negotion

Sweden

El Salvador Speech to the HLM

My delegation endorses the statement made by Argentina on behalf of G77 and China and we wish to express our gratitude for the UNODC development of new initiatives for crime prevention work. We express our staunch support to UNODC to continue carrying out its work in a timely way. Due to its strategic position on the continent, central America suffers from organised crime and the positioning of cartels which have converted our countries into transits. We seek to guarantee regional security from a comprehensive standpoint. We are all aware of teh adverse impact on drug trafficking on security and stability, corruption and terrorism. We repeat our firm condemnation of all these scourges. We believe in the need for mechanisms to prevent and combat all these problems to combat violence and we look for alternative means to combat drug prevention and crime. In this spirit we wish to point out the regional summit – the cartaljena declaration and plan of action. It is important to have a shared and common responsibility and we should investigate and punish crimes related to drugs. A serious threat to peace and social stability is the problem of the criminal action of gangs, this is a cross border matter and we are working out comprehensive polices for direct conduct against these gangs for rehabilitation. We are also working to encourage the signing of internatiaonl conventions and we are working towards an international law enforcement academy which facilitates technical training for all officials. We support the establishment of a regional centre in el Salvador, mr costa will be visiting my country to inaugaurate this. We want to share experiences and look at every link in the chain. We believe it is important to have networks and combat this scourge. Madame chair there have been many challenges from the 1998 ungass general assembly session and it is only the political will that means we can come to grips with this and destroy our populations.

Statement of Myanmar at HLM

Myanmar is the second largest producer of opium in the world, after Afghanistan. Their objective to achieve an opium free country by 2018.

Day 2 begins - Statement of the Kyrgyz Republic at the HLM

The Kyrgyz Republic spoke up strongly for harm reduction and HIV prevention, including the need to address stigma and discrimination as central part of a harm reduction approach.

Statement of Malaysia at HLM

ATS is a growing problem in the country, more so than heroin.

It noted that there were 6,000 people on OST in national programmes and another 18,000 receiving it from private clinics. There are 10,500 regular users of NEP.

There were 12,350 drug dependent people recorded in 2008.

Statement of Ecuador at HLM

Ecuador ‘Promotes and guarantees the full respect for human rights within its territory’. It noted that national policy includes rehabilitation of drug addicts.

The statement described its approach as a ‘De-securitisation of drug policy which allows us to address the problem from the perspective and health and human rights’. The country about to pass new national plan.

Implementation of Plan Columbia creates risks along Ecuador's northern border, including trafficking, aerial spraying and the destruction of the livelihood of people in the border area.

Statement of Cameroon at HLM

Cameroon expressed its support for the statements of the G77 and the African Union, made yesterday.

It noted that cannabis is the drug most used in the country.

Statement of Romania at HLM

Romania expressed its support for the EU statement made yesterday, which was very strong in support of harm reduction.

Statement of Turkey at HLM

Turkey stated that allowing drugs for treatment services must be accompanied a firm commitment to reduce demand, and that this must be explained to the world community.

Statement of Thailand at HLM

Thailand expressed that the Prime Minister's PM reiterates its commitment to respecting human rights and Thailand's human rights obligations in the context of drugs. It said that drug users will be treated as patients and traffickers will be treated proportionately and under the rule of law. It noted its support for measures aimed at reducing the adverse consequences of drug abuse.

Sweden

aMENDMENT TO op12 TO MAKE SIMILAR TO ccppJ AFTER 5TH LINE WITHIN IT'S MANDATE TO DELETE "WITHIN IT'S MANDATE AS RECALS 55CCJ AND ONWARDS" ARGENTINA - IS THIS OF A TECHNICAL NATURE? SWEDEN -YES

Statement of Venezuela at HLM

Venezuela stated that prohibitionist policies have failed when they are directed only on supply, and that is was ‘high time to give a more humane approach to this problem’ that focused more on the health and social consequences of drugs rather than criminalisation.

It stated that countries must ‘perfect laws’ so that they respect the right to health.

Statement of Oman at HLM

Oman expressed concern about violations of human rights, and affirmed its obligations to observe international commitments.

Statement of Cote D’Ivoire at HLM

The statement said that the country was ‘Facing the worst crisis in its entire history’.

It expressed concern about the prevalence of ‘smoking dens’, noting that 29 smoking dens had been destroyed during recent police operations.

Drugs lead to the spread of HIV in the country both via injecting and via unsafe sexual behaviours.

CND day 3 – Plenary, demand reduction and related measures: Colombia on behalf of Grulac

Children and Adolescent rises in drug use is very worrying in our region. Long term strategies are needed.

Grulac

Statement of Kenya

Kenya noted increased numbers of people who use drugs, especially along the Indian Ocean coastline. This situation was described as a“Drain on national resources’. The statement noted that drug use was emerging as being linked to increasing incidence of HIV.

Cannabis most used drug in the country. Heroin and cocaine are ‘increasingly finding their way to all parts of the country’. Khat is also widely sued.

'Treatment is not only expensive it drains society’s resources’, according to the statement.

Statement of Peru

Peru is the second largest producer of cocaine in the world. It is both a producer and consumer country, although the the consumer aspect often overlooked.

Young people under 18 and from 19—25 have the highest level of drug use use, and more than 1 million people overall have used cocaine derivatives in their lifetime.

Peru and Thailand are proposing joint CND resolution on alternative development next week.

Statement of Poland at HLM

The Polish statement called for the equal application of law and human rights. It cited the importance of preventing of HIV, hepatitis and other BBVs, and specifically promoted harm reduction approaches to accomplish this. It discussed the importance of access to pain relief and essential medicines, targeted interventions for youth and 'high risk groups' and the importance of involving NGOs and civil society in the drug policy process.

It noted that the percentage of IDUs in the country was stable, and that there was a reduction in incidence in BBVs, that drug related deaths fallen and that access to harm reduction measures has increased.

Statement of Croatia at HLM

Croatia stated there were 27,000 'drug addicts' in the country, and that police annual reported 8000 drug offences. There is no data on drug-related secondary crime. Croatia called for strengthening of joint international methods to help control the problem, and is preparing to join the EU Monitoring Centre on Drugs and Drug Addiction.

Statement of Pakistan at HLM

Pakistan stated that the world drug problem requires effective and enhanced international cooperation, and that joint efforts have resulted in Pakistan being almost opium free.

The country has adopted new drug control ‘master plan’ 2009—2013, and has enhanced its commitment to drug treatment and rehabilitation. In 2006, it conducted a national assessment of drug use in cooperation with UNODC.

It stated that rehabilitation and social reintegration programmes must be of equal importance as other drug control efforts.

CND Day Four Plenary Tu

Many steps at supply reduction 217 tonnes of drugs neeg greater containment of supply. Expects the house to appreciate this for th

Egypt

West africa and Asia are the main regions for smuggling hashish in Egypt; counter narcotic measures where taken;
Schedules are being updated at the moment to make the sentences for drug smuggling more severe;
opium plant

Statement of China at HLM

In June 2008 new drug control law came into force in China. The statement described the country' approach to drugs as being ‘people based’, yet continued to state that it practiced both voluntary and compulsory drug treatment treatment.

China engages in practical cooperation with the international community in many enforcement areas and alternative development efforts. It ‘highly evaluates and supports’ the new Political Declaration.

China calls for international cooperation to promote all aspects of international law and obligations, including human rights. No mention made of harm reduction, despite rapid scale up of harm reduction interventions in China in recent years.

Statement of Viet Nam at HLM

Viet Nam noted that 60% of all HIV infections in the country are linked to injecting drug use. It thanked UNODC and donor countries for support for drug control activities.

CND day 4 - L10 - Measures to support African States in their effort to combat the world drug problem

Moldova statement at HLM

Moldova encouraged all states to ratify international instruments related to drugs and crime. Its statement made no mention of harm reduction, despite the fact that Moldova is a leader in prison harm reduction programmes in the region.

Day 2 begins - Statement of the Kyrgyz Republic at the HLM

This is the official written text of the Kygyz Republic.

'I am delighted to address you from this esteemed podium, and in the name of the Republic of Kyrgyzstan, present you a short summary of the narcotics situation in our country, our national anti-drugs policies, and steps we have taken to prevent drug use and promote harm reduction.

Narcotic substances have been used in Central Asia for a long time. During the Soviet period, Kyrgyzstan had one of the world’s highest levels of industrial opium production. There are also large areas where cannabis and ephedra grow in the wild.

Due to the opening of borders when the Soviet Union fell, and the Afghan Civil War and increased drug production of Afghanistan, the Kyrgyz Republic became one of the main transit routes for the trafficking of Afghan opium and heroin to the CIS countries and Europe.

The situation is exacerbated by the growing domestic production of opium at illegal poppy plots as well as hashish and marijuana production from cannabis plants. There has been a transformation of the drugs business, and it has merged with other forms of organised crime.

The negative changes which have occurred with the drugs situation both regionally and globally demand that the government develops an effective policy to counter the problem. This is further underlined by the other serious threats that go together with increased drug use, such as the HIV/AIDS pandemic and the spread of other dangerous infections.

We understand very well that no country can deal with these threats on its own. This is why our state has decided on integration into the global system of countering the illegal drugs trade.

The republic is working to improve international and regional anti-drugs cooperation. Relevant agreements have been signed that establish mechanisms of cooperation in countering the threat from drugs.

At the national level, the government has developed and approved a Conception to Counter the Spread of Drug Use and the Illegal Drugs Trade, as well as three nationwide programmes to counter drug use and trade. The first started in 1997, and the latest programme will run until 2010.

Currently, in addition to the steps taken to lessen the availability and trade of illegal drugs, there are also active measures being taken to reduce demand.

Special attention should be paid to work carried out in the prison system and with former inmates. Since 2002, work has been carried out in the country’s penal institutions to treat drug dependence, and to provide injecting drug users with the whole range of necessary legal, social, medical and diagnostic services, and also to help them reintegrate into society. There are also syringe exchange and substitution therapy programmes being implemented.

I would also like to draw your attention to the national initiatives aimed at countering the threat from HIV/AIDS that comes from the increasing drugs problem. These initiatives are implemented on the basis of the national strategic plan, and in accordance with the declaration of the special session of the UN on HIV/AIDS.

The state is taking the path of humanising the legal and administrative framework around drug use and removing unnecessarily retributive tendencies. Changes and additions have been made to the country’s legal framework.

I would also like to touch on the strategy of “harm reduction”. At the current time, this is one of the highest priority strategies in the fight against drug use and trade in Kyrgyzstan, and is also a fundamental part of the state’s policy of preventing HIV among injecting drug users (IDUs).

In Kyrgyzstan we understand that it is impossible to talk about harm reduction if drug-dependent people are subjected to stigmatisation and discrimination. We are working hard to make sure that people who use drugs have access to social, legal and medical services, as well as substitution therapy.

In conclusion, we can say that although the market for illegal drugs in the country continues to grow, the government is taking active measures at local, regional and international levels aimed at checking the flow of narcotics from producers to final users.

Given the following factors:

The positive experience of the Kyrgyz Republic in the area of reducing the supply and demand for illegal narcotics;

The destabilising role played by drugs production in Afghanistan, and the far-reaching negative consequences associated with this for human health;

The unsatisfactory nature of the poor progress made in the fight against the production of drugs in Afghanistan;

The negative medical, social and economic consequences of drug use, including the spread of HIV/AIDS;

The need to safeguard human rights and have a humane attitude towards people who are suffering from dependence and need treatment:

We call on the international community to develop and implement at the highest level a package of anti-crisis measures to tackle both the supply and demand of illegal drugs, paying special attention to countries with low income levels among the population, though which drugs are trafficked;

We call on the countries through which international drugs traffic passes to take greater responsibility for the demand of illegal drugs;

We call on governments to pay special attention to reducing the demand for illegal drugs, to ensure access to drug prevention schemes, harm reduction programmes, and drug dependence treatment, including substitution therapy, as important conditions of preserving the health of the population and countering the threats from drugs;

We call on governments to increase spending on countering drug flow and use and minimising the negative consequences, however hard this may be in the context of the global financial crisis.

To all the participants of this Session, I would like to assure you that the government of our country is open for cooperation with the international community on the whole range of issues concerning both the main substance of this session and also as regards human rights and democracy. Kyrgyzstan expresses great thanks and appreciation to all the international organisations that offer help and support in creating and strengthening contemporary approaches to ensuring a dignified quality of life for the people of our country, including the UN and the UNODC.

We are certain that our joint efforts and practical work together will ensure a full and adequate response to the threats that we face.

Thank you for your attention.'

CND Plenary Session Day Five

Meanwhile over in Geneva, IHRA and Human Rights Watch make a statement on drug policy at the Human Rights Council

While most of the drug policy and harm reduction activity is centred around the UN headquarters in Vienna this week, there is also a session of the UN Human Rights Council taking place in Geneva. This morning, IHRA and Human Rights Watch made a joint statement on human rights and drug policy. This statement was in response to the report of Prof Manfred Nowak, UN Special Rapporteur on Torture, who devoted a section of his most recent report to the Council on human rights abuses related to drug enforcement. The text of the IHRA/HRW statement is below.

Interactive Dialogue with the Special Rapporteur on Torture
10th Session of the Human Rights Council

Joint statement of the International Harm Reduction Association (IHRA) and Human Rights Watch


Thank you, Mr. President.

I am making this statement on behalf of the International Harm Reduction Association and Human Rights Watch. We warmly welcome Professor Nowak’s report, and in particular his call for a human rights based approach to drug policy, one which has now been echoed by the High Commissioner.

The list of human rights abuses committed in the name of the ‘war on drugs’ is even longer than Professor Nowak’s report indicates, and includes torture and ill-treatment by police, extra-judicial executions, arbitrary detention, racial discrimination, discrimination in access to health care, including HIV prevention and treatment, and the denial of access to essential medicines - all related to a disproportionate focus on restrictive drug policies over public health and human rights.

This is not just a national issue. Drug policy is a truly global issue and it is connected to an international drug control system that has neglected human rights for over sixty years. The UN Commission on Narcotic Drugs has never once condemned any of these abuses, nor has it taken action to address them.

Today, following a review of progress since the 1998 general assembly special session, the CND will agree to a new political declaration that will guide the next decade of international drug control. So far, input from Professor Nowak, the Special Rapporteur on the right to health, UNAIDS, and over 300 civil society organisations has been effectively ignored. Sadly, this declaration reflects none of the lessons learned from the last ten years, and sets the tone for another decade of human rights neglect within the UN drug control system.

Together with the International AIDS Society, we have called for its rejection.

Mr. President,

The Human Rights Council can be an engine of change in international drug policy. In this connection, we would like to ask Professor Nowak the following:

How can the human rights machinery within the UN, including this Council, begin to mainstream human rights into international drug policy?

And what can be done on an urgent basis to ensure that the CND addresses the concerns raised in your report?

Thank you, Mr. President.

IDPC presents a new role for law enforcement

During a satellite event on Wednesday 11th March, entitled ‘A new role for law enforcement’, the International Drug Policy Consortium presented a new vision for law enforcement within the context of harm reduction. Mike Trace, the chair of the session, noted the polarised nature of the debate surrounding the role of law enforcement and the need for new thinking on this challenging issue. The speakers Professor Peter Reuter from the University of Maryland and Tom Lloyd, a former UK police chief, outlined how law enforcement can play a positive role and be more efficient, effective and reduce more harm. Traditional law enforcement has emphasised reducing the scale of the market – a costly strategy that has not yielded the desired results and that often contributes to the harms associated with drug use and markets. Law enforcement should take a more balanced approach and emphasise reducing the harmful consequences associated with drug markets. Tom Lloyd asked the question that law enforcement officials should ask themselves, ‘If your child was arrested for drug possession would you want them to be prosecuted and convicted... or guided, supported and if necessary treated?’

National Statement of Ghana to the Plenary

As you may be aware in December last year we had fresh elections in Ghana and now have a new president. My president gives you warm felicitations. The Ghana delegation associates itself with the Africa group. Let me express my sincere gratitude to unodc for their unflinching support to Ghana in fight against illicit trafficking and abuse that has become the cancer in our society. Our gratitude is extended to the cooperation of the international community. The global illicit drugs problem is a long and complicated one. Illicit drugs are clandestinely produced and trafficked across the world. The problem is insurmountable. The menace of drug trafficking has caught many countries in the cross –fire. The issue of drug addiction and drug trafficking globally has become more complicated. Social, medical and legal forces all take part in the resolution. Ghana is therefore committed to the conviction that international cooperation will go along way to minimise if not eradicate the menace. In combating crime no nation can claim to be self sufficient. We as developing countries can only make the head way to control delivery. The sure way out is for national law enforcement agencies to cooperate at the international levels so that criminal organisations cannot operate across borders. Ghana is a signatory to all four main conventions against drugs and Ghana has international obligations the infringement of which would result in sanction. We have domestic law to meet our obligations. Ghana has benefitted and continues to benefit to the fight against illicit drugs and work with the UK, USA, Germany, France, Canada, Egypt, EU, just to mention a few – we are grateful to all these countries. Madame chair, having shared responsibilities with other international communities. We now wish to present the following observations and concerns, the level and extent of shared responsibilities cannot be classified as reciprocal. In fact it seems lop sided. It is one way traffic from developed countries to developing countries. Expensive equipment is sent to developing countries, which we cannot maintain. We are in the parasitic rp;e. I suggest you consider funding maintenance work or training of local users of equipment / implementers of programmes. Information exchange, responsibilities here are more reciprocal. Here, there are hindrances. This takes a considerable period of time and resources. International partners should consider the needs and resources of local countries when requesting information exchange. Madame chair in the field of implementation of conventions, these responsibilities should be shared among cooperating nations. Most nations provide or protect specific interests. For instance, while the issue of cannabis is treated with all the seriousness of drug crime in many African countries. In some countries, i understand possession or use is not criminalised. It would be helpful if the international laws could be in a form that can be ratified and implemented straight into domestic law without further law being required. Apart from legislative bottle necks, information exchange can also serve as obstacles. In international cooperation, most nations receive foreign training to improve the capacity of their organisations to combat the drug menace. There are problems of shared responsibility. The government support unodc to decentralise its activity. We need the support and cooperation of all.

The United Kingdom Addresses the HLM

The head of delegation for the United Kingdom addressed the HLM plenary in Vienna today as follows:

"The UK would have wished to see a bolder document. There are many examples i could give, but i will give only one - Paragraph 20 refers to the link between drug use and HIV AIDS. A key technique in preventing HIV AIDS is harm reduction. Yet those words appear nowhere in the paragraph or otherwise in the document. This is obviously at variance with other UN documents and with millennium goals. This sends confusing and damaging messages to governments and agencies seeking to grapple with this epidemic and we hope our reservation on this point is entered into the minute."

"We support the declaration despite the reservations we have about it and we hope it will be used creatively and responsively to meet the challenges we will face in the future."

Switzerland Addresses HLM

The Swiss delegate addressed the High Level Meeting today as follows:

"10 years ago 70% of Swiss people viewed issues of narcotic drugs to be among the most major problems in society, now only 10% so view it. How come? In the 1980s Switzerland saw some open drug scenes which had a damaging effect to those using and to society as a whole. Human misery become visible in a manner unprecedented. In 1990s the policy adopted, a policy of enforcement, was showing its limitations. A new solution was clearly required to be able to deal effectively with this problem whilst remaining within the framework of prohibition. We adopted a different approach based on four pillars – prevention, treatment, harm reduction and enforcement. These four pillars are complementary and each reinforces the others. In November last year the swiss voters chose to incorporate this strategy into the national legislation. The most distinctive component of our strategy is harm reduction – a focus on efforts to reduce the consequences of drug abuse to the individual and to society as a whole and it focuses on the threats to public health posed by HIV AIDS. Harm reduction includes medical programmes of needle exchange, these efforts reduce harm and assist survival and have had a tangible result – the deaths have fallen by more than half, and death of HIV AIDS has dropped by 80% - the number of addicts has fallen and their general health has improved. Treatment based on heroin has reduced drug related crime by 70% so Switzerland has effectively combatted the drug problem with its four pillar strategy. This approach has won wide recognition and has inspired other countries."

"In the course of this preparatory process to the HLM, Switzerland worked hard to have acknowledged that supply reduction and demand reduction is not enough. Nevertheless it is nonetheless indespensible in our view to eliminate negative impacts of drug use for our citizens and society. Since these measures help to reduce HIV AIDS they are an essential contribution to achieving millennium development goals. These measures respect human rights including the right to health which must be respected in all circumstances. Switzerland would have like to see a pragmatic approach. Of course the fight against trafficking is essential but assistance to drug users is also essential but this has not been focussed upon in the political declaration"

Portugal Addresses HLM

The delegate of Portugal spoke to fully endorse the EU statement and said:

"The UNGASS review process shows that the 1998 targets have clearly not been achieved albeit some progress in some regions. Unfortunately achievements in the area of drug demand reduction have been limited and require strong commitments. In line with EU drug strategy 2005 – 2012 and EU action plan, the Portuguese policy on drugs follows multidisciplinary and balanced approach. Drug demand reduction programmes are integrated and we work to reduce the adverse health and social consequences of drug use. Cannabis continues to be the most commonly used drug in Portugal. Heroin remains the most related to drug related health consequences. We suggest effective responses at treatment and harm reduction level with a decline in disease. The availability of social programmes continues to increase. Needle and syringe exchange, substitution treatment and outreach work led to a decrease in intravenous drug use and Intravenous drug injecting taking place in better sanitary conditions – these protect drug users and society as a whole. The effectiveness of harm reduction measures have been confirmed by WHO and UNAIDS."

"Taking this into account Portugal is very disappointed that the political declaration fails to recognise that harm reduction is an instrumental aspect of demand reduction. The political declaration, however, we will adopt, but we hope that as new challenges emerge new action plans should be adopted in keeping with the challenges"

Italy Addresses HLM

The delegate of Italy addressed the High Level Meeting as follows:
"The Italian government has taken an extremely firm stance against the use of drugs and psychotropic substances."
The delegate stated: "1. Drug consumption is illegal, there is no right to take drugs, not even occasionally = on this Italian law is firm; 2. All narcotic substances are equally damaging to human health with each triggering psychoactive effects; and, 3. – chronic drug addicts must always be seen as persons to be brought back to normal life and the state must guarantee each individual when it comes to treatment and cure. Our purpose must be to liberate addicts from drugs and so any intervention must aim to achieve the full recovery of the person and so he can reinsert himself into the market. Italy recognises the secondary prevention methods of drug abuse, related diseases, hepatitis, hiv, but such interventions must be seen as preventive of health damage by typical of behaviour of drug addicts and must minimise likelihood of crime and assist the full recovery of the person and not make the condition chronic. With respect to fundamental pillars above, the Italian Government plans to launch adequate policies increasing awareness of health damage caused by drugs. Italy is bringing into place drug testing for workers in safety–affecting jobs. We need to take a socio-sanitary approach. We are an ardent supporter of neuroscientific studies so that we can better understand how the brain is affected. Studies are under way to evaluate social actions that instead of stigmatising addicts offer a chance of job opportunities and the ability to become financially independent. Despite the determined efforts by law enforcement to fight drug trafficking at home and on the internet – we have developed a new early warning system. In a world increasingly worried that anything can produce negative effects on human health, we should not allow drugs to affect themselves on the insides, doing terrible damage to drug users as a whole. The battle can be won. We must provide greater support for normality and the many people who do not use drugs, and consider it reproachful."

Egypt addresses the HLM

The delegate of Egypt addressed the High Level Segment of the CND speaking of challenges faced by his country, not least: the continued illicit cultivation of cannabis and opium plants which takes place in rugged terrain and which leads to increased chances of resistance of drug enforcement authorities; that the region is used to smuggle narcotic drugs, especially hashish, because of its geographical position; the diversion of chemicals and licit drugs to illicit drugs; and the drop in international support to countries facing increasing drug problems.
The delegate particularly called upon the INCB to take necessary measures to reduce the use of tramadol internationally and to increase efforts to curb demand at the same time as supply. He expressed hopes for a general debate.

Australia Addresses the Plenary Session of HLM

The delegate for Australia today addressed the High Level Segment of the Plenary Session of the High Level Meeting as follows:

"This high level segment marks a cross roads, it is an opportunity to look back and mark progress achieved since 1998, but it is also an opportunity to look forward and decide on priorities. Active engagement of the multilateral system is a key pillar of our priorities and we are committed to address drug challenge collectively. Australia is pleased that the political declaration recognises the need for a balanced and integrated approach to the drug problem. This is what we do domestically – based on a balance of supply, demand and harm reduction strategies. The use of illicit drugs has decreased in general. The Australian strategy has three pillars. The first is demand reduction, prevention is a priority with multi media drug campaigns, alerting young people to the dangers of drugs encouraging avoidance or treatment when needed. We maintain a multi faceted approach to drug treatment. Harm reduction is the second pillar of our strategy. We have a decreasing number of those dying from overdoses. We tackle the problem of IDUs passing on HIV, through needle exchange and harm reduction campaigns. We work across South East Asia to fund such programmes."

"We work in community partnership with indigenous communities and we are working to close the gap between life expectancies. The third pillar is supply reduction. A growing network of law enforcement officers and screening of all cargo and Australia has focussed on preventing the development of precursor chemicals and diversion of precursors and we have raised cooperation and capacity in our region and through cooperating with UNODC and we are contributing to the funding of data collection in Asia and we promote a range of alternative development offers which have to be integrated into broad development programmes in order to be successful."

"Australia joins others in welcoming progress made in the last decade, we recognise this is an enduring challenge. Australia looks forward to the adoption of the political declaration and we trust it will provide an important framework for action."

Laos Addresses the High Level Segment

The delegate of the Lao People's Democratic Republic addressed the plenary session of the HLM this afternoon:

"We have had a 26% increase in opium production in the golden triangle area since 2006. This trend requires careful monitoring to ensure there is no further escalation of opium production. ATS addiction is now a big threat to the country and the costs of crime, corruption, violence, treatment, law enforcement and the loss of productive citizens to the community, the loss of children to their parents and parents to their children – these lossess continue to accumulate. We have utilised many approaches, mass education, public media, we have said no to drug and become advocates to drug prevention in their own community. We need to stop the increase in transit flow to our country as well as to prevent the influence of transnational organised crime. We need to reduce the harm from drug related behaviour that could increase HIV AIDS. To address this pressing issue, the Laos government has just approved a national masterplan, jointly developed with UNODC, and this addresses rise of production. The masterplan responds to the hightened risks this activity poses to country order. "

"Drug and related problems are global problems. The Lao People's Democratic Republic is not able to address these problems alone. I require the help of the global community and the international cooperation to address the effort. The Lao government welcomes assistance and support to enable us to achieve the goal of creating a drug free prosperous society governed by the rule of law for all Laos people. We have the global food crisis, the climate crisis, and the financial crisis – it is now more important than ever to work against a global drug crisis."

Colombia Addresses the High Level Segment

Colombia addressed the High Level Segment today with the following national statement:

"Experience shows that some of the manifestations that impact on this scourge are severe, perhaps more so than 10 years ago. The illegal drug industry is now based in illegal networks of terrorists and governments, these weaken democratic institutions and increase criminal activities, destroy human rights, and is the case 10 years after the adoption of prevention of narcotic drugs and psychotropic drugs and substances. On the principles of demand reductions we certainly face new and challenging demands. We certainly need to provide treatment for sick people and not just inflict punishment. We have now to renew our commitment to multilateral efforts guided by joint responsibility, integrity and faithfully discharging our commitments. States must join all efforts to counter various manifestations that make up the chain of the world drug problem such as natural and manmade substances, trafficking and laundering of assets and financing of terrorism."

"The government of Colombia is considering a new body to bring together public health activities. We should not be using traditional law enforcement but even less will we be legalising drugs. We will be providing treatment. We believe that the free development of the personality ends where respect for the rights of others and the rule of law starts. We have extreme violence – legalising would not assist. Since 1999 our authorities have eradicated a total of 1million 9o0000 hectares. Over the past year we have seized over 1000 tonnes of cocaine. We were able to seize 30kilos of solid substances and 21million gallons of fluid substances. Support for alternative development was provided, we’ve been able to contain the laundering of assets and trafficking of weapons, ammunitions, and explosives and we have fully respected our mutual legal assistance responsibilities. We have been able to apprehend and seize substances and we have civil forfeiture in place for drug traffickers in possession of tainted assets."

"We are very concerned about the harm caused to the environment. 1 gramme of cocaine = many hectares of rainforest destroyed. Columbia will not allow the destruction of the most important area left to counter global warming and under the leadership of president uribe our country have stepped up efforts to counter traffickers. We are hostile territory to traffickers."

"From this standpoint of common responsibility. We stand ready to offer our experience to the world but at this point in time we extend a hand and assistance to all countries. Now let me take off my hat as minister and official representative. I would not like to see my children or grandchildren use drugs. It is a terrible maelstrom for any human beings. For my grandchildren and yours and mankind as a whole, i wish to have a world free of drugs. Columbia stands ready once again to say we will not lower our guard and we are here to counter this most dreadful scourge of the past years."

USA Makes National Statement to HLM Plenary

The delegate of the United States addressed the plenary session of the high level meeting today with the following:
"The USA takes its responsibilities under the un conventions very seriously. The US is committed to reducing the availability of illicit drugs at home and abroad. It is gratifying to see these issues raised in such a distinguished forum. Historically many saw these efforts peripheral to international diplomacy. The US believes that the action plan of 1998 remains relevant. We have made much progress about the science of addiction and many now have access to evidence based drug prevention and treatment programmes. Successful events have been made to counter trafficking. International law has expanded as well as international cooperation with extraditions. There are some disagreements among us but these are modest.
The US is committed to pursuing policies that work to reduce both drug trafficking and drug use. There is no litmus test."
"The USA is revieing our national strategy and it will include a more comprehensive approach including needle exchange to prevent the transfer of HIV AIDS. "
The US funds research at home and abroad. We are eager to share experiences and hope the lessons we have learned will be useful to others. We are proud of early detection of drug abuse – screening and prevention – under which model, patients receive medical services in regular health services. Prevention is a key component of our strategy. School based prevention and media campaigns and health based messages provided by parents and other adults in a youth’s life. Drug treatment courts are also a key component. We understand that our responsibilities go beyond our borders. We recognise that some countries face unique burdens. These problems are exemplified by what the tremendous military and police in Mexico are facing. We see drug trade there as a a great threat to our nation. We have pledged over a billion dollars to Mexico to assist them in their anti-narcotic efforts. Columbia is a nation remarkably transformed from a few years ago and we all owe thanks to Columbia for its huge efforts resulting in less cocaine in every country of the world. Afganistan will need sustained support from un and member states to come. UNODC has played a positive role in both Afganistan and its member states. We owe it to ourselves and to the people of Afganistan to assist them. Africa has become a trafficking route, and there has been increased drug consumption, and a greater risk of corruption of democratic institutions."
"I would like to thank UNODC and INCB in meeting the threats posed by methamphetamine and the smuggling of precursor chemicals. In 2006 the commission adopted a resolution that requested that all members provide estimates of licit precursor chemicals including pharmaceuticals to INCB. Over 100 countries have provided these estimates voluntarily to date and to those who have not provided estimates, i encourage you to do so. The work of this commission is so important. We must intensify our multilateral efforts – this global problem requires a global solution. We have to be proud of the last 10 years and know that there are challenges yet to be met in the next 10 years. We have a responsibility to reduce drug consumption within our borders and collaborate with others around the global in the effort against illegal drugs."